Friday, February 16, 2007

Meeting Wizard is Magic

One of the things I recall with less enthusiasm is chasing multiple clients to schedule meetings. You know, you call with dates and times. They don't respond. You ask again; they offer totally different dates. It's a nightmare that can consume your time and energy.

Recently, I found an online solution to scheduling woes that works pretty well called Meeting Wizard It's web-based software that enables you to set meetings quickly. You can either designate a specific date and broadcast that to attendees; or, you can propose several dates and times and poll attendees for the best one.

What I like most about MW is the ease of use and it's cost- free. I've tested it with several meetings and it works, although there are a few glitches. Namely, the software doesn't ask if you want to make a distribution list from the names you entered. Consequently, if you want to send a follow up message you need to reassemble the list from the online address book. Also, if you can miss notification of RSVPs if you set it to tell you once everyone has responded. If one person forgets to respond, you don't get any notice.

All in all, this is a good tool for automating one of the more time-consuming tasks of being a mediator or case manager. Check it out and let me know what you think.

Try. Fail. Learn. Grow!

Dina

PS Things are blossoming over at ADRPracticebuilder.com --great new members are connecting in exciting ways and Getting Referrals - the 37 Cent Solution on 3/8 is filling up quickly. My wish is that each of you manifest your vision into reality-- it's too much fun!

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1 Comments:

At 8:16 PM, Anonymous John said...

That's mighty handy. Another free option is doodle (http://www.doodle.ch/)--not as slick as MW looks to be, but there's no need to create an account, and it's always nice to have options :-)

Since I already use SurveyMonkey for my research work, I often use it for polling about meeting times. The nice thing about going that route is that I can ask for two pieces of information: when can people attend and how do they rank the times they can attend--handy on those happy few occasions when you have the quality problem of having to choose between several dates that everyone can attend.

 

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